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tv   ABC World News Now  ABC  March 15, 2011 2:05am-4:00am PDT

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h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h h [ female announcer ] to get fresh-baked rich, indulgent chocolaty brownies you don't have to open your oven... just the refrigerator. ready-to-eat pillsbury eet moments. find them in the refrigerated section of your store. you've got a strawberry pop-tart, bui've got a warm, fresh baked strawberry toaster strudel. see the difference? mmmm. i do. (announcer) pillsbury toaster strudel. the one kids want to eat.
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opra sabes? at thespeaking at the funeral, and everybody was so moved by that. >> daddy has been the best father you could ever imagine. oprah: what is your favorite memory of your father? >> that's really hard. oprah: i'll let you think about it while i ask you the same question, your favorite memory. >> when we were on bahrain, we used to wake up early and walk the beach with a coke, coca-cola and skittles or snickers. oprah: waking up and walking the beach. >> yeah. oprah: that's a good one. >> i just have to say spending some "quality time" away from
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the two, just me and him. oprah: mm-hmm. >> the one time we went on the roof when we were in las vegas--of our house--and we just saw the luxor lights. we just saw the city of lights. we were eating snickers, and we had some soda, and... oprah: what kind of dad was he? was he a strict disciplinarian or could you get away with anything with him? >> he was strict. >> he could get away with anything. oprah: he could ger away with it, huh? >> uh-huh. oprah: he could get away with it. you couldn't get away with it? no? and so when you would have quality time, what would you do besides eat snickers? >> sometimes he would take me to an art museum because we both loved art, and we would do a lot as a family. we would play tag outside, and he got us kenya 4 years ago. oprah: kenya the dog, the lab? >> come here, kenya. oprah: it's your cue, kenya. >> here you go, baby. oprah; so when you were living with your father, did you think
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that the rest of the world doesn't know, but did you feel that that was sort of a normal-- was that normal to you? >> yeah. i kind of felt like no at a good father he was. i'd say he was the best cook ever. oprah: a cook? really? >> yes. everyone is all, "a cook?" like they're surprised to hear it. oprah: yes, i am. >> he was just a normal guy, except for he was, like, the best dad ever. oprah: well, that's part of the reason why i wanted to do this and really happy that you all would talk to me, because i think the world certainly doesn't anything about him as a father, and i think even just the few words that you spoke at his funeral allowed people to have just a little bit of insight into the kind of father he was. like, i'm shocked to hear that he was a cook. what could he cook? >> he made the best french toast in the world. oprah: dipped in eggs, right? >> yeah. he just made the best breakfasts in the world. oprah: mm-hmm. would he cook for you guys a lot? >> yeah. oprah: what do you miss the most?
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>> everything. oprah: everything? everything. well, thanks for talking to me really. i appreciate you sharing that. really do. [captioning made possible by king world] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] nature valley sweet & salty nut bars... they're made from whole roasted nuts and dipped in creamy peanut butter... ♪ ♪ ...making your craving for a sweet & salty bar... ♪ ♪ ..rresistible. by nature valley. ♪ ♪
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welcome back. now to our top story once again, the disaster in the pacific. after the quake, waves of terror washed upon japan's shores. wiping out towns, roads, everything in its way. >> the sheer scope of the disaster caused delays in rescue efforts in many cities, including kesennuma. the bbc rupert winfield hayes was there when rescue teams arrived three days after the quake. >> reporter: in kesennuma, reality has been turned on its head. a large ship sits on a dock side. a fishing boat on top of a car. a car on top of a fence. and a house in the middle of the street. this was kesennuma on friday as the massive tsunami swept in,
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tossing boats aside like children's toys, uprooting houses and turning the city streets into torrents of angry blackwater. much of kesennuma is still under water and walled in by mountains of debris. every street we tried to get down is jammed with piles of cars. even the rescuers are struggling to find a way in. when they do, mostly what they're finding are bodies. this one, a man found trapped underneath a car. nearby, i find this man. his house has been completely destroyed. you can see the tide mark at the top of the first floor. here? but he was lucky. he shows me where he says three bodies were lying until yesterday. one hanging from a lamp post. the old lady in the house next door has also disappeared.
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the old lady in the house next door has also disappeared. when the wave came in, i thought the wave came i i was going to die, he tells me. the water came up around my legs and i thought i would be swept away. and i though i saw a child being swept out to sea. there was nothing i could do to save it. a few meters away, another of his neighbors is picking through a few the debris of her house, trying s neighbors is picking to find something, anything, that is still usable. her hall is miserably small.serably small. everything here has been utterly destroyed. the level of devastation is really quite hard to comprehend. and this is just one small town. it's still not clear how many is is just one sma more places like this there are scattered along the coast that how many none of us have seen yet. as we're preparing to leave ast that kesennuma, there's a sudden flurry of excitement.ng to leave the helicopter hovers low over the town center and from amid the helicopter h the destruction, two survivors are plucked to safety. it is a rare moment of hope. the only one we saw here all day.saw here all
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rupert winfield hayes, northern japan. infield hayes, n >> really just incredible as we continue to get new pictures, new coverage. especially some of these coastalpictures, towns that were hit the hardest, entire towns completely al flattened with most of the population just gone. ompletely >> just gone. just gone. we watched so many reports yesterday and literally the we watched so smell of decomposed bodies at this point, you know the bodies they'll find in all that rubble, th it may take weeks and weeks to find everybody. it's just heartbreaking to watch this all play out. some towns literally not there it's just anymore. re anym >> to say the least, very tough. we'll lighten the mood a little bit, kind of.ghten the mood this guy joked about the disaster in japan, we've been talking about since friday, but his employer is not laughing along with him.out since friday, the controversy now involving gilbert gottfried. along with him. >> that's right.controversy now invo also the celebrity overachiever who's more than just a pretty face. tyra banks sets her sights on an ivy league goal. also the celebrity overachiever who's more than just a pretty face. tyra banks sets her sights on an ivy league goal. sights on an ivy league goal.
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♪ skinny so skinny ♪ welcome back.
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>> we haven't done "the skinny" in a while. it's nice to be back. >> what's even nicer in like 20 years, charlie sheen is not in "the skinny." it's a sheen-free skinny. >> sheen-free show. >> which is nice. >> apparently, we've been talking about this tragedy in japan. some people need to be reminded every now and then that, you know, not everything is funny. >> right. >> there's not a time to joke about everything. but apparently gilbert gottfried is learning that the hard way. you may recognize aflac, the insurance company, and you know their sound. which is -- do we have it? >> i'm glad we got aflac. >> aflac. >> there we go. i didn't know that until tonight that's gilbert gottfried. >> who knew. >> there's a big contract with him and aflac does a ton of business in japan, so why gilbert would tweet some of the things he tweeted yesterday. look at this. you see there on the screen. japan is really advanced. they don't go to the beach. the beach comes to them. then even worse he writes, "i just split up with my girlfriend but like the japanese say, there
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will be another one floating by any minute now." >> anybody watching the news coverage as of late is just disgusted by that. >> what an idiotic horrible thing to say in the midst of this tragedy. i can't believe he said that. aflac didn't find it funny. he was kicked out, fired as the voice of that duck there. rightfully so. what a stupid thing to say. >> if you hear the duck and say, aflac, you'll know why. no longer gilbert gottfried. someone different. guess who's going back to school? not just any school but one of the best schools. we're talking about harvard and tyra banks. she's going back to get a business degree. she's in the harvard owner presidential management program. she's not just a pretty face, rob. >> really? >> she's a smart cookie. the reason she's doing this is because of her female followers. she wants to be an inspiration to women who are also interested in owning and running their own businesses. you, too, can attend this program tyra is attending. it will only cost you $31,000 a year. >> oh, that's it? >> for three weeks. >> $31,000 for three weeks? >> the program is three weeks a year for three years. 31 grand a pop, per year. >> is she going to get a degree
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or a course? >> it's a course where you learn how to run your own business and be the president of your own business. way to go, tyra. miss smarty pants. spending the big coin to go to harvard. >> i'll save comments i have on that. i'm sure she'll be valedictorian. apparently the sex tape is its own industry in hollywood but apparently there's a sex tape out there of usher and his ex-wife tamika foster, for sale. all this coming from tmz, they say they received photos and a short video from someone willing to sell the tape. they do have two sons together but now usher's sex tape could be floating out there. >> how do people lose their sex tape? that's always my question. you have the sex tape, shouldn't you, like, protect the sex tape? >> you would think. you would think. ♪ oh, my ♪ he'll be saying that in a few weeks when that thing gets out there. >> do we have time to go to -- >> no. >> no, we're going to move on. >> think about usher, looking for his tape. >> oh, really? we know what peggy does in her free time.hink about usher, lo
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ing for his tape. >> oh, really? we know what peggy does in her free time. really? we know what peggy does in her free time.
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updating now the disaster in the pacific. japan's prime minister is telling anyone near the fukushima nuclear plant to stay indoors to avoid radiation sickness. a u.s. official tells abc news a reactor explosion and fire could be catastrophic. experts say friday's quake was a magnitude 9.0 jolt, that's been upgraded from the 8.9. the death toll could reach 10,000 in just one province alone. japan's stock index the nikkei took another major dive. today's drop was around 12%, that's after a 6% plunge on monday. and finally, it is almost impossible to actually fathom the disaster in the pacific but there's one other thing that also seems impossible. this time, however, it's good news. >> amongst all the death, destruction and even ongoing
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confusion, the japanese people have come together in some pretty unbelievable ways. here's diane sawyer. >> reporter: here in the landscape left behind by the storm without pity, the people here show what's always been at the heart of the japanese culture. you need the food. you need the food. >> oh, we are fine. we have enough for us. we want to share. >> reporter: in japan shinto buddhists and confucian traditions promote considering community when you consider yourself. we saw this video on youtube the moment after the earthquake interrupted a graduation ceremony. a brief moment of confusion and then everyone working together to clear the rubble. the prime minister used the phrase in announcing the blackouts he said would be required because of the shortage of electricity. >> translator: this is the toughest and the most difficult crisis for japan. >> reporter: but now we learn the government-ordered blackouts
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don't have to happen because the people voluntarily stopped using nonessential power. this is a shelter. some of these people here for days and, look, it's recycling, organized for recycling. >> plastic, combustible, burnable, cans. >> reporter: the japanese call it etai, it means to come together as one body. and something else astonishing after a disaster, not a single reported case of looting in a country of 128 million people. you'd never believe this mother and so many others patiently hold their children for three hours while waiting to get food. and before we leave, a new mother traveling the day the earthquake struck giving birth amid the aftershocks saying "i hope the baby is strong and brings new hope to japan." >> isn't that incredible? we were commenting on that yesterday, we have not seen 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this morning on "world news now" -- nuclear crisis. another explosion and fire at a japanese power plant. it is now in big trouble. >> the immediate risks to the japanese people and how the government is responding. it's tuesday, march 15th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." and good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm peggy bunker. for thousands of evacuees the latest radiation threat is added to the long list of fears following friday's earthquake and also tsunami. their daily struggles and the health threat they're now facing today. >> an expert on nuclear science will join us in this half hour to help us all understand exactly what's happening in japan now and what precautions are really necessary. how about this, a lot of
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people aren't thinking about the cars but the disaster in japan could lead to shortages of one of the best selling cars sold here in the united states. >> it's amazing as we go through the first days of the aftermath, the ripple effects, the economy, the nuclear concern, the economic concerns. it's really -- >> we'll be feeling it for a while. >> affects everything. first, of course, to the radiation leaking from one of japan's damaged nuclear reactors. the government is telling people who live nearby to stay indoors to avoid getting sick. >> and they're also being warned the risk of more leaks is very high. diana alvear is joining us from narita. diana? >> reporter: good morning. i wish i had better news for you this morning but, of course, the news in japan is increasingly grim. the official death toll has pushed past 2400 and all comes amid renewed fears of radiation exposure. this explosion was different. this time officials immediately warned everyone to stay away from the fukushima facility.
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the fear, that radioactive material could seep out from the damaged reactor. we understand that others may be saying there may be damage or cracks. their response earned a rare public rebuke from the prime minister. naoto kan told reporter he was not officially informed of the explosion for an hour and told tepco, pull yourself together. that was followed by reports of a fire at yet another reactor. residents are being tested for radiation exposure and authorities have distributed more than 200,000 iodine pills, a preventive measure for radiation sickness. even the "uss ronald reagan" was forced to turn back. testing showed several sailors received a month's of radiation in an hour after passing through a radiated cloud. the constant anxiety is hampering efforts to rescue survivors and deliver supplies. increasingly, their efforts are unsuccessful. those who did survive are sifting through the rubble of what's left of their homes. looking for anything to salvage. i want to point out even as far
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away as narita, we've been effected by the third explosion. right after it happened, people came up to us and made sure we were taking preventive measures in relation to radiation exposure. we were encouraged to take iodine tablets and carry these, radiation badges and they darken if the levels of radiation rise. >> and the radiation threat is so serious, our own crew covering the story had to move. >> that's right. abc akiko fujita is now in japan. akiko, we want to know what you're hearing there from that location about the nuclear crisis and also if the residents that you've come in contact with actually trust what the government is telling them. >> reporter: well, what we're hearing is that there was, indeed, a third explosion. from this time the reactor number two. at 6:00 this morning. you know, it sparked immediate concerns. we have heard of those other two explosions but this reactor was the one most severely damaged. and the crews had been working around the clock to try and cool it down with seawater but those
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efforts failed this time and that's why the explosion damaged the steel containment structure. government officials evacuating emergency workers out of that area right away. and just urging people, anybody that is left within that 12-mile radius to just get out. now, we got a sense of just how urgent the situation was when we heard the prime minister speak in a nationally televised address earlier today. he went as far to tell people who were outside of that evacuation zone to be sure to stay indoors and monitor radiation levels. we have heard from officials saying that the radiation levels are only at dangerous levels in that area immediately surrounding the plant, but after what we have been monitoring the last few days, there are concerns about what -- how those levels can rise next. >> akiko, how is this playing out in the streets with the survivors there in terms of just -- are they panicking? are they hitting the stores? how is this playing without real people in the streets trying to get through the day? >> reporter: well, there's
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definitely a sense of unease, i guess is the best way to put it. you hate to say widespread panic but it really has kind of kicked up a notch. we've seen people going to grocery stores, long lines outside, people stocking up on food, people stocking up on water. really whatever's left of fuel because they know that if they are anywhere near this plant, they may have to stay indoors. if they have to do that for a while, they know supplies are running short. >> thank you so much to abc's akiko fujita, who's been with us since the beginning. thank you so much. the nuclear crisis is raising safety questions about nuclear plants in japan and also here in the u.s. abc's martha raddatz went looking for answers. >> reporter: we wanted to know what is the worst case scenario in japan. >> the reactor cores in several reactors get so hot, they fuse into a molten mass that bursts through the containment structures, spewing radioactivity into the water, air and ground.
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>> reporter: unlike chernobyl, these japanese reactors are surrounded by six-foot steel and concrete containment vessels, so even multiple reactor meltdowns would not likely be as bad as chernobyl, but if there were meltdowns, how far could the radiation travel? >> if the wind is blowing out to the ocean, as it usually does, then most of the contamination goes out there. if the wind shifts south, well, then all that -- some of the most heavily populated areas of japan are at risk including tokyo itself. >> reporter: how about the u.s.? >> the fires could be so hot that it would send radioactive particles carrying it across the pacific. >> reporter: the nuclear regulatory commission says even if that happened, there is a low likelihood that any harmful radiation would reach the u.s. or its territories. but uncertainty could continue for weeks in a scenario where there is no meltdown but the reactors are not stabilized either. martha raddatz, abc news, washington. and now we turn to what can only be called an absolute
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miracle amid japan's ongoing horror in all of this. while combing the rubble of one village, rescuers came across a 4-month-old little girl. it's believed she was alone for three days. they found her father and reunited the two. a tsunami warning sounded soon after that but it was followed by the all-clear. >> incredible story there. here in the united states, they're still cleaning up along the west coast after last week's tsunami. california officials say the damages could top $40 million. in crescent city the coast guard began putting down booms in case the damaged boats began to leak oil and gas. efforts to place the booms on sunday had to be postponed because of high winds. and the catastrophe in japan is going to have an effect here, especially if you wanted to buy a japanese car. brands like toyota's popular prius hybrid are made entirely in japan. production there has been suspended and there's no sign the assembly lines will be running again any time soon. of course, you can stay with
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abc news throughout the morning and throughout the day as we continue our coverage of this disaster. we'll get an explanation from a nuclear expert coming up later in this half hour. of course, you can find updates from japan any time on abcnews.com. in other news, there's been a second fatal tour bus crash in the new york city area. this time the accident was on the new jersey turnpike near east brunswick. the driver and a male passenger sitting behind him were killed. about 40 people were sent to area hospitals and at least five were in a trauma unit. and we now know the driver of that horrific bus crash in the bronx over the weekend had a suspended license and several other traffic violations. another person has died in that case, bringing the death toll to 15. wabc's lucy yang reports on the investigation. >> reporter: as investigators, examined every piece of the wreckage for answers we're learning the overnight tour buses to casinos are not popular just with gamblers but also with the homeless population. >> to beat the shelter system,
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we ride the buses. i'm not just talking about myself. i'm talking about hundreds. >> reporter: these buses actually provide a cheap and easy escape from the harsh, cold streets of new york. for a couple of bucks, the homeless get to sleep on warm, plush seats and enjoy a hot meal at the resort. it is a night of luxury they can actually afford. 55-year-old miguel was doing just that when the bus he was riding crashed on i-95 early saturday morning. he was among the 15 who died. friends tell us he was actually $3 shy of the $15 ticket that night, but came up with the extra cash and hopped on board. his getaway would prove far more dangerous than the streets he was fleeing. >> he said it would be a peaceful night for him just to get away. he could sleep on the bus. get something to eat and come back the next day. >> reporter: another homeless man who did not want to appear on camera says, he rides this same chinatown buses and claims the driver now under scrutiny, ophadell williams, routinely fell asleep at the wheel.
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>> always known to be dozing off. especially when we hit the gravel, that's what alerts us. >> reporter: officials still trying to identify two victims who were killed and one survivor, an asian male in his 50s who remains in critical condition. lucy yang, abc news, new york. >> lots of unanswered questions in that one. awful story. here's a look at your tuesday weather. showers from indianapolis to cleveland and pittsburgh. stretching south to nashville, raleigh and atlanta. rain/snow combo from fargo to duluth. showers in the pacific northwest. and 1 to 3 feet of snow from the cascades to the rockies. >> 56 in boise. 65 in colorado springs. 87 in phoenix. just shy of 40 in the twin cities. 56 in omaha. 68 in dallas. miami climbs up to 80. atlanta, 65. here in new york, 51 degrees. tens of thousands of people in miami are still recovering from the world's largest street party. >> you missed this one? this didn't meet your schedule? >> i can't believe i missed it.
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>> they crammed into little havana for the annual calle ocho festival getting their fill of food, music, dancing. the party stretched 23 blocks long. >> yes, indeed. >> and even a special zone just for kids. >> i like the adult zone better. festival goers had 300 vendors to choose from. the event has grown since it first started way back in 1970. miami is one of my favorite cities. they know how to party out there. >> calle ocho, people screaming at their tvs saying, calle ocho. they were all there. we'll be back with more.ocho. they were all we'll be back with more. hó
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we, of course, continue to watch the fragile situation in the daiichi nuclear plant. the main concern is the fear of radiation leaking from those damaged reactors. >> and joining us now to help us understand radiation sickness is jerry jenkins, director of radiation laboratories at purdue university in indiana. thank you so much for being with us here, mr. jenkins, appreciate it. >> good morning. how are you? >> very well. our first question to you is we're hearing comparisons to chernobyl, how bad the situation could be, and then we hear other people say, you know, these nuclear plants are completely different from the ones that existed in chernobyl. can you clear that up for us? >> that's absolutely true. the chernobyl reactor was a russian design based on a graphite moderated reactor. when fissions happen in a reactor, neutrons are emitted and those neutrons need to be slowed down. as they get slowed down by
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graphite, they can be slowed down far enough to cause a fission in uranium atoms. light water reactors, which is what they have in japan and also in the united states, the water is what slows down the neutrons as opposed to the graphite. in the case of a light water reactor if you have a loss of coolant accident, which is what we've experienced at three mile island and at the daiichi plants, when the coolant goes away, you also lose your moderators. so the reaction shuts down. in the case of chernobyl, the moderator stayed there, it was graphite. it didn't evaporate. >> in laymen's terms, the concern everyone is talking about, in the media especially and reports from the ground, is the fear of a meltdown. in laymen's terms explain what a meltdown is and why that is considered to be the worst case scenario. >> the fuels are made of ceramic and surrounded by metal. you can actually make a ceramic become hot enough to melt and it would melt just like a candle would.
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it would melt from the hottest part down to the lowest part. that actually goes through a process of called candling so if looks like candle wax dripping down the fuel rods. we actually did experience at three mile island a meltdown 30% to 55% of the core, somewhere in there, actually melted and that molten part of the core actually relocated to the bottom of the pressure vessel. the pressure vessel stayed intact, so the molten core never left the pressure vessel to actually reach the containment floor, but the containment also stayed intact. what they're experiencing in japan right now, if the fuel has actually melted, it appears that that the -- any molten fuel is still in the pressure vessels itself and has not reached containment yet. >> so, we know that the risk of people maybe getting some radiation from the surrounding areas. would you even know if you were exposed to radiation? thinking about the people there, if this were to drift over in any kind of, you know, form over
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the ocean, how do you know if you've been exposed to radiation? >> well, the only way to really know is to have it measured, unless you get immediately sick, and then you've probably received a dose of radiation that can kill you. but they're not talking about radiation levels anywhere near that right now. the radiation levels that are even between units two and four, which are right now the most effected units, unit four is where the reactor was and unit two is where the present loss of coolant accident is, the radiation levels there are not lethal. they are dangerous, but only to the people that would be in that area. they're not dangerous to people in the surrounding areas. and they've cleared out everything for 12 miles, i believe. >> very interesting. >> so, there's no chance of anybody getting hurt by that. >> well, certainly good news. that comes as a relief. thank you, jere, from purdue university. we appreciate you spending a few minutes with us. we'll be back with more "world news now."
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ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ
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ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ ñ well, imagine hitting the ocean for a little sightseeing cruise and when the sights of the ocean hit back -- >> that is exactly what happened in the island of capri, florida, when a dolphin jumped out of the water and into a private sightseeing boat. our affiliate has more. >> just incredible. i mean, quite an experience. >> reporter: for lieutenant keith perry, it's a once in a lifetime call. a dolphin, playing near a boat, flips himself right into it. perry caught it all on camera. >> i've never heard of it. i've heard of them beaching themselves when they're perhaps chasing fish but i've been at this station for ten years and never run into such a call. >> reporter: the call came from a charter boat captain. a group out on the river to sightsee never expected this close-up. >> his head came in, obviously come in this way and his head
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was right there at the lady's feet and his tail was about here. >> reporter: a tight spot for a dolphin that weighs an estimated 600 pounds. ten men tried to lift it but he wouldn't budge. >> he actually seemed in my opinion that he knew what was wrong, he knew he made a mistake, shouldn't be there and he relaxed and let us do our things. >> reporter: with ropes and towels they got him on a backboard and slipped him back into the water. gone as quickly as he came. >> didn't even flip his tail or, you know, bounce a ball on his nose for us, nothing. >> reporter: a woman on the boat did suffer a sprained ankle. fortunately, no one else was seriously injured. >> the people were a little distressed. of course, they got plenty of pictures and they were shocked as well. made their trip. >> that was a smart dolphin. i'm in the wrong place and i'm going to get out as soon as i can. help me out. coming up, a big decision at indiana over a public building's name. we've talked about this story a few times here on "world news now," before me. you'll refresh people's memory. >> we'll see if can you say the name with or without laughing. >> first name harry. >> second name -- we'll be right back.me -- we'll be rig
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call today. >> announcer: "world news now" delivers your "morning papers." well, we have some very important news to bring you today in "morning papers." >> i think people have been up all night wondering about this. >> up all night, worried about this. this story we first brought to you a few weeks ago because there was a situation in ft. wayne, indiana, where they wanted to name this new county government center where they will consolidate the offices. they wanted to name it after the former mayor. >> whose name was? >> harry baals. >> what is wrong with that? >> what is wrong with that. but, of course -- >> there he is. there is mr. baals. >> there's mr. baals. as you can imagine, there was a lot of idiots out there, like me, who laughed at this and made some of the late night rounds and got some international attention here because, you know, some people smirked at the name, harry, harry baals. okay. but online voting, they wanted this name. anyway, they decided not to go
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with that. they're going to call this thing -- i think it's the -- where is it -- citizens square. >> much nicer. >> because they figure they just want to move on from harry baals and not, you know, deal with all the -- >> although, i think it's -- it's a misstep on their part. it could have been -- people go out of their way to see a ball of twine. they might have gone to the harry baals building. >> they might have gone there. the current mayor said we want this building to be about all citizens of ft. wayne, not just harry baals. >> mr. baals. i'm going to call him mr. baals. by the way, b-a-a-l-s. >> yes, respect mr. baals. i love this story. these are my people. this person i really like. this is an italian man who grew up in italy but his mom and sister live in boston. and they love boston. he recently passed away and deeded his estate and home worth about $1 million to the city of boston. there it is. doesn't look like a million bucks but apparently comes on a big parcel of property. >> i didn't know you could do that. he left something to an actual city, cool. >> which is cool.
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however, part of the will says in order to get this property you have to take care of the dogs that live in the house. argus and jack and five cats. so, there are seven animals in there that need to be taken care of. in order for boston to get this property, someone has to take care of the pets. he wanted the pets to be comfortable in their home establishment. i get that and i say kudos to you. >> he put the burden on the city of boston, the mayor or city council -- >> the mayor says, they're in italy, what do you want me to do? he says, we'd love to take it but how can i feed these dogs? >> i'm sure the legal department will have fun with that. he's been dead for a while now. >> oh, man. a fun story out of the pittsburgh area. we've been upset when you get your car back and it's not filled with gas. you let someone borrow it and they bring it back and it's on empty. >> like you last time. >> sorry about that. sorry about that. there was a case where a man and woman got into a nasty altercation. he ended up like firing inside her bedroom, female roommate brought the car back empty, he got upset, started shoots at her.
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he's been arrested.
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s after another explosion and fire at a japanese nuclear plant. >> today's evacuations, precautions and fear after friday's earthquake and tsunami. it's tuesday, march 15th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." and good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. just how serious is this nuclear threat in fukushima, japan? we'll explain what's happening and how it's impacting thousands of evacuees. also ahead, the struggle for people who are literally living without food, water and a steady supply of electricity. and how disaster relief agencies are now trying to meet all those countless needs for so many folks in that country. >> yeah, water being one of the biggest priorities.
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you can imagine just struggling to get that. also coming up later, how facebook and google have become online lifelines for people separated from their loved ones during the disaster. >> impressive. the power of social media these days. >> coming in very useful. first, the nuclear crisis in japan is dramatically more tense this morning. radiation is now leaking from the crippled nuclear plant. >> this has prompted the greatest fears yet about the possibility of nuclear damage. akiko fujita is joining from narita. akiko, what is the latest as the world watches what's going on there? >> reporter: well, peggy, you hate to use the word widespread panic in any situation, but i can tell you, to say the people in japan are on edge, would be an understatement. this after word of yet another explosion at the fukushima daiichi power station. the latest explosion occurred at the second reactor at 6:00 in the morning. and it sparked immediate concerns because that reactor, out of all three, was the most seriously damaged. while crews have been working around the clock to cool the reactor with seawater, efforts
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that worked for the other two reactors failed this time. the explosion damaged the steel containment structure. emergency workers were withdrawn from the plants and people within that 12-mile radius, anybody left within that radius were told to evacuate immediately. prime minister kan in a nationally televised address went as far to tell those just outside of the evacuation zone to stay indoors and continue to monitor radiation levels. radiation levels have increased, but officials are quick to point out that they are only at dangerous levels in areas that are within close proximity of the plant. but that did little to ease concerns at the financial market. radiation concerns caused the benchmark nikkei to plunge 13.6%. meantime, it's been an exhausting 24-hour operation for rescue any remaining survivors from the tsunami.
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some towns reporting they cannot handle all the dead bodies. and evacuation centers are starting to report they are running out of food and water as well. >> and, akiko, did any of these fears prompt you to have to move throughout your reporting today? >> reporter: yeah. we were actually 40 miles south of the nuclear reactor plant. that's where we spoke to you from yesterday. but this morning after hearing reports of this latest explosion and assessing the situation, we decided to move further west, a way -- far away from the plant as we can. now we are headed back to narita, which is further south. >> akiko, thank you for that report. as always, live from japan. stay safe, of course. residents also living closest to the plant are being told to stay inside to avoid radiation sickness. those who fear they've already been exposed are flocking to centers to be tested. david muir reports now.
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>> reporter: entire families who escaped the shadow of the doomed nuclear power reactors are coming here, worried they were exposed to radiation. we were given extraordinary access to the test site where medical teams wearing hazmat medical teams wearing hazmat suits used megaphones to direct parents and children where to go. they use geiger counters and hand-held scanners, checking one by one. there are nuclear reactors in trouble at the fukushima daiichi plant. just two days ago an explosion at reactor one released radioactive material into the air, then just yesterday a second blast at reactor three releasing more, and while dramatic these are not the worst case scenarios. there is growing concern over reactor number two becoming dangerously overheated. inside each of those buildings it's a fiery hot nuclear core inside a small structure. cool water must be pumped in to avoid a disastrous meltdown, but the pumps failed in the earthquake and the tsunami, so they've been flooding them with ocean water. that too not working. the red hot cores were exposed and now real fear of a complete
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meltdown. already here trace amounts seeping out from those first two explosions. authorities told us more than 100 people in just one day testing positive. they've been taken to area hospitals for further testing. and this image, isolated for contamination, peering through a window at her dog. the evacuees keep coming. this woman brought her parents and grandmother. the question, is the government here being completely forthcoming? this couple tells us they understand the government doesn't want to scare the people, but they also suspect they are not getting the full picture. and a sign of just how dire the situation has become, we've now learned the japanese government has reached out to the iaea, international atomic energy agency, and to the u.s. they're in a desperate race to avoid a catastrophic meltdown here. david muir, abc news, koriyama, japan. amid the ongoing horror in japan comes a miraculous story
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of survival. while combing through rubble of one village, the japanese defense force came across a 4-month-old girl. it's believed she actually spent three days alone. somehow, the good news is, they found her father and were able to reunite them. minutes after that, though, came another tsunami warning, but it was followed by the all-clear. what a lucky, lucky, little girl. >> unbelievable. as we heard at the top of the half hour, the tokyo stock exchange continues to hemorrhage in the wake of the disaster.animaler -- major selloff sent nikkei down 12%. that came despite several moves by japan's central bank to try to stabilize that fragile economy. the u.s. military is operating helicopter rescue missions off the aircraft carrier "uss ronald reagan" and so far this morning they've rescued stranded survivors, delivered supplies and helped move injured to the hospital. as our christiane amanpour found out, so much more is needed.
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>> reporter: "i need food, i'm running out of food," says this business woman. the good news is some aid was prepositioned. part of japan's earthquake preparedness. "we're trying to feed 2,000 people, maybe more. we'll continue as long as our rice lasts," says this aid worker. but the rice, like the rest of the supplies, is not nearly enough. so much more is needed and the effort is herculean. we saw that firsthand at the red cross command center here. what is your biggest challenge right now? >> the biggest challenge is for our relief operation at this moment is logistics. >> reporter: much of northern japan's infrastructure is in tatters as we saw from the air. coastal roads, bridges and rail system are all under water. making it nearly impossible to reach by land. so, for now, the humanitarian intervention is dependent on military helicopters and other aircraft to bring supplies in. even so -- can you cope for
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caring for the whole coast? >> this is beyond our imagination. >> reporter: the red cross tells us that despite logistical difficulties the most urgent priority is getting food and water to any who may have survived. after that, the grim task of collecting the bodies. christiane amanpour, abc news, tokyo. and our coverage of the disaster in the pacific continues later this half hour. we'll take a look at nuclear energy, exactly how it's made and what really leads to a dangerous situation at a power plant. you can stay tuned for "america this morning" and also "good morning america" for live updates from japan. another big headline we're following is another fatal bus crash in the new york city area. at least two people, including the driver, died after a luxury bus crashed near east brunswick, new jersey. the bus was on its way to washington, d.c. from new york after a weekend crash that killed 15 people. that bus also headed to new york from a casino. investigators looking into saturday's crash and they want
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to know why the driver was behind the wheel in the first place when his license was suspended. a space shuttle worker has fallen to his death at the kennedy space center. the first launch pad fatality there in 30 years. he was identified as james vanover, an engineer for nasa contractor united space alliance. shuttle "endeavour" is being prepped for its final launch next week but work was suspended for the rest of the day and grief counseling was provided for coworkers. let's take a look at your tuesday forecast. showers in atlanta, the carolinas, nashville, pittsburgh and cleveland. also indianapolis. milder in the upper midwest with a mix of rain and snow from duluth to fargo. heavy rain from seattle to portland and a foot of mountain snow in the rockies, up to 3 feet in the cascades. >> a wet 54 in seattle. 61 in salt lake city. near 70 in albuquerque. 45 in chicago. 56 in kansas city. 51 here in new york. 65 in atlanta. and 80 in miami. >> looking pretty green, though, in chicago, where the luck of the irish is flowing through the city, just in time for st. patrick's day.
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>> the chicago river now looks more like a shamrock shake as the city gears up for one of the biggest st. paddy's day parade. thousands showed up to watch as motor boat crews poured nontoxic dye into the river, turning it all, yep, bright green. >> the river-dying tradition dates back four decades. >> got to love that. >> got to put in the nontoxic thing. you know that's what people are asking. >> more "world news now" coming up. [ female announcer ] your whites...start out with a bright future... then...over time... become dull... and lose their luster because washing in the bargain brand can leave dirt from the wash on your clothes causing your whites to get dingy. new improved tide plus bleach helps to remove the dirt in one wash to bring your whites back to bright. turning white-ish to...wow. tide plus bleach.
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welcome back, everyone. to some sports news and also the future of the next nfl season, it seems the players and the owners were never even close to a labor deal last week. >> messy situation. now the players have been locked out, putting the season in jeopardy. t.j. winick is following negotiations. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and peggy. it's more than five months until the nfl regular season begins, so this impasse may last a while with neither side apparently willing to back down.
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>> free football! >> reporter: this is what nfl sundays could look like this fall. some frustrated baltimore football fans took to the streets this weekend to protest the possible cancellation of the 2011 season. this, after a stalemate between the league's owners and its players. >> any business where one party says you need to do x, y and z because i told you is a business that is not only not run well, it is a business that can never be as successful as it can be. >> reporter: the players union decertified friday after two-plus weeks of mediated negotiations. in response the owners locked the players out, putting next season in jeopardy. >> you just keep trying. >> reporter: there are two main disagreements. first, money. how to split up the nfl's annual revenue of about $9 billion. the second issue is the schedule. the league wants to add two more regular season games for a total of 18. the players say that increases
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their risk of injury and they deserve compensation. >> we believe that ultimately this is going to be negotiated at the negotiating table. >> reporter: an april 6th hearing has been set in the federal antitrust lawsuit filed by the players against the nfl. even if the lockout is lifted by injection, the nfl would likely appeal and shut down the sport again. >> we're frustrated, we're disappointed, but we are not giving up. >> reporter: according to the wall street journal, nfl owners have already set aside enough money to cover them in case the 2011 season is canceled. rob and peggy? >> another ripple effect of this thing, of course, the nfl draft is set for next month. that's a great tradition because college guys come out with the hat and uniform of their new team but now grumblings the union is discouraging prospects from attending next month to muddy the waters bought they're saying even with the pending lockout there still will be a draft in -- >> a lot of football drama. we just want to see the games. we want to see them back on the field. >> i love football.
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>> coming up, we'll return to our top story coming up. to our y coming up. >> i l ball. >> coming up, we'll return to our top story coming up. ababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababababab
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welcome back, everybody. all eyes are on the fukushima daiichi power plant this morning, where fears of leaking radiation are continuing. >> what exactly is going on there may be a challenge to understand, so here to break it down is the bbc's david shukman on why the nuclear power plant is in trouble in the first place and what they're trying to do so fix it. >> reporter: near the nuclear power station, a scene most people would dread. a test for radioactive contamination. as authorities struggle to control the reactors, the key question is, whether the risks are escalating. the installation took a real pounding. this picture was taken before the disaster. here it is just after. much of the sites black with mud from the tsunami, which also wrecked the backup power.
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and here it is today, with two of the reactor buildings destroyed. crucially, though, the reactors inside are thought to be intact. that's the assessment of the international atomic energy agency. its experts are monitoring the disaster and they believe the vessels holding the reactors and the main containment systems have not been damaged. >> reactor vessels and primary containment vessels, these are designed to prevent the massive release of radioactivity stay intact. as a result, the release of radioactivity is limited. >> reporter: questions have been raised about several nuclear power stations but especially the two at fukushima on the coast with the station known as daiichi, now the scene of a frantic effort. what's meant to happen inside a nuclear power station is this -- in the reactor the rods of nuclear fuel go through the process of fission, the atom splitting and releasing energy.
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water is pumped in and flows around the fuel where it heats up and turns into steam. that drives generators to make electricity. but if a reactor runs dry, as one did today, the fuel rods overheat and melt and that may have started in three reactors. the nuclear fuel could then sink to the bottom of the reactor, the beginning of what's known as meltdown. but provided the steel wall of the container does its job, there shouldn't be a leak. no one can get close to check exactly what's happening. these shots were filmed before the earthquake, so how bad could things get? well, they tried several times to pump water into one of the reactors, like in this training exercise. but they kept failing. what could follow? we asked the british government's chief scientist. >> in that situation you would get an explosion and radioactive material would be emitted but it would be emitted to about 500
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meters and it would be a relatively short duration of the order of an hour or so. compare that with chernobyl, which is a really serious event, where the top blew off the reactor. >> reporter: the chernobyl accident 25 years ago spewed a radioactive cloud over hundreds of miles, but it's thought this is highly unlikely in japan. mainly because the japanese reactors are better protected. even so, how far could any radiation spread? the winds have been changeable, but luckily, the forecast now says they'll blow out to sea. david shukman, bbc news. >> a lot of people are comparing this to chernobyl which people say that's not accurate because they're completely different nuclear reactors, the way they're built. >> that's the thing. you don't want to panic people. that's the obvious comparison. elsewhere may not be anywhere near that dramatic. important to point out in all the continuing coverage of this. >> yes. coming up, the frantic earthquake survivors, of course, are trying to find their missing
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loved ones. >> the lifeline online, success stories through facebook and google. stories through facebook and google.
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and finally now from the moment that news of the disaster in the pacific started to spread, online social networks became a main source of information for many people. >> that's true. the social networks have also become a very powerful tool for those searching, of course, for missing loved ones. here now is juju chang. >> reporter: on that day, amidst the chaos and confusion in sendai, this woman was teaching kindergarten. >> i was trying super hard not to have a breakdown and just -- i was shaking, but i was with all these little kids. and i kissed their foreheads. >> reporter: her husband, jesse and their 3-year-old daughter jessica, were across town. >> you're just panicking and wondering if your kid is okay. your husband's okay. >> reporter: with phone lines jammed, she turned to social
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networks, facebook. "jesse, where are you," she wrote on her husband's wall. "i'm near sendai station. what do i do?" >> my whole body was tense and shaking. my muscles were so sore from being like tense nonstop. >> reporter: instinctively her husband, too, turned to facebook. he said, "jessica and i are safe." they struggled to reach each other until finally a facebook savior. >> through facebook i heard that they were going to a friend's house. we wouldn't have found each other for a whole lot longer if it wasn't for facebook. >> reporter: pleas from loved ones in 140 character tweets or photos shared on tumbler, everyone clinging to any hint of survival. like julia here at home, desperate for word from her daughter, kate. >> i have my lifelines here. i've got my bible, my phone and my computer. >> reporter: google quickly launched a people finder service, already it has more than 130,000 postings. i am your niece, akemi, writes one family member. please call as soon as you can.
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we caught up with akemi in new york, whose name american is carmen barnes. her two uncles and aunt and at least a dozen of their children and grandchildren all still missing. >> i want to get on a plane and go over there myself, you know, and go door to door, but i know that's crazy. >> reporter: her family, especially her mother, is tormented by the silence. describe for me what you're going through. >> it's agony. it really is. just not knowing. i just wish somebody could tell us whether they were in a shelter, whether they survived, whether they're alive, whether they died. >> reporter: and that story echoes for so many as the waiting and searching continues. >> juju chang reporting. very important tool there, that a lot of folks are using. thank goodness for facebook in those instances. >> the power of these two sites, not just trying to find missing after the disaster but sowing the seeds of a revolution. find missing after the disaster but
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r explosion and fire at a crippled nuclear plant in northern japan. >> just as earthquake and tsunami survivors attempt to recover, their fears seem to be so far from over. it is tuesday, march 15th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." good morning, i'm peggy bunker. >> i'm rob nelson. we'll hear from an american this half hour who help develop a nuclear plant in northern japan that's in big trouble right now. we'll find out his concerns and see what u.s. nuclear plants located in earthquake zones in this country can do to prevent similar disasters. also ahead, astounding new pictures of a coastal community that was completely leveled. take a look at that. what once was a popular seaside
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get away in japan. and later an american comic cracks a joke about the disaster in japan and his employer, as you can imagine, didn't think it was too funny. the controversy this morning over gilbert gottfried later in "the skinny." >> unexpected. those details pretty surprising. the nuclear crisis in japan has gotten much more dangerous. radiation has leaked from the reactors after another explosion just hours ago. >> anyone living close by is being told to stay inside to avoid radiation sickness. akiko fujita is joining us from narita. akiko, good morning to you. >> reporter: good morning to you, rob. this is a country that's been on edge since the massive quake hit last friday. word of yet another explosion at the fukushima daiichi power station took those concerns to a whole other level. the latest explosion occurred at the second reactor at 6:00 this morning and sparked immediate concerns because that reactor out of all three was the most
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seriously damaged. now, while crews have been working around the clock to cool the reactor with seawater, efforts failed this time. the explosion damaged the steel containment structure. emergency workers were withdrawn from the plant and people within that 12-mile radius were told to evacuate immediately. the prime minister in a nationally televised address went as far to tell those just outside of that evacuation zone to stay indoors and continue to monitor radiation levels. those levels have increased. but officials are quick to point out they're only at dangerous levels in areas that are within close proximity of the plant. now, that did little to ease concerns on financial markets, though. the nikkei plunged 13% on radiation concerns. >> now -- >> reporter: further north it's been an exhausting 24-hour operation to rescue any remaining survivors from the tsunami.
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some towns reporting they cannot handle all the dead bodies that have washed ashore. and evacuation centers are now reporting they are running out of food and water as well. >> akiko, just amazing to hear some of the details there. we know this has had an impact on you as well. you said some of the workers at that plant have been asked to leave. i know they were staying there, trying to keep the reactors cooled, but now they've been told to evacuate as well? >> reporter: they did. we did get a chance to spend some time at the evacuation centers where those evacuees are being brought to. they have set up radiation screening out there. people just waiting around, trying to figure out what to do next. i'll tell you, it's a very -- really, a surreal scene, seeing people wearing body suits getting tested for radiation. >> frightening scenes out there. akiko, thank you for that live report. appreciate that.
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and also moving on now, the nuclear crisis in japan is being watched especially closely by an engineer from the seattle area. he has a unique insight into the nuclear facilities' inner workings. luke duecy of our seattle affiliate komo has that story. >> reporter: an explosion rocked the fukushima daiichi nuclear complex in northern japan and as thousands are evacuated and thousand are evacuated and screened for exposure -- >> i'm concerned. i'm very concerned. >> reporter: here at home ron is keeping a closer eye on the situation than most. a physicist and engineer he tells me 40 years ago he helped develop and manufacture all of the control panels and nuclear sensors inside the plant. >> i have yet to see somebody from the plant that's an engineer that can actually tell us what's happening. they can't see inside there because it's highly radioactive. >> reporter: so far japanese officials say the explosion caused no damage to the reactor inside, but ron wonders how officials know that. >> i'm not sure the politicians
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are terribly right because they're using some phraseology that isn't quite appropriate. >> reporter: friday's earthquake knocked out electricity to daiichi while the tsunami flooded out backup generators. he tells me without power, the control panels don't work. >> you need power. >> reporter: and the plant itself he tells me is nearing the end of its life. >> these particular plants were started up in the '70s. >> reporter: designed to last about 40 years, many nuclear power plants like daiichi have already been shut down. that doesn't mean, necessarily, they're dangerous. >> we've already mothballed some here in the united states. >> reporter: would you equate with them being unsafe or -- >> no. they're just old. >> our thanks to luke duecy from komo. with the nuclear situation in japan showing no signs of improving, concerns are now only growing here in the united states. just how safe are our nation's nuclear power plants? some of the 104 nuclear facilities in the u.s. are very
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close to fault lines. david wright went to one of them in california. >> reporter: a deadly natural disaster that threatens to unleash an even deadlier man made one. the operators of the san onofre nuclear power plant insist they're prepared. is this plant safe? >> absolutely. >> reporter: we asked the white house to explain how u.s. nuclear safety standards compare to japanese ones. >> u.s. power plants are designed to very high standards for earthquake effect. >> reporter: of the 100-plus nuclear power plants in the u.s., 11 are in areas prone to earthquakes. early indications are the daiichi reactor withstood the quake and tsunami, but as we know that one-two punch cut off the power supply and then knocked out the backup generators, a scenario the industry calls a station blackout. >> there are many pathways to station blackout at atomic reactors here in the united states.
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tsunamis could do it. earthquakes could do it. >> reporter: in japan the station blackout left battery power as the only way to cool the reactor long enough to shut it down. industry officials say the batteries in japan were designed to last 8 to 12 hours. apparently, not long enough. in the u.s., some backup batteries last half that long. >> some of the batteries in the u.s. are not as good as the japanese. >> reporter: here at san onofre, they say they have learned a lot from past disasters. now, across the country, nuclear power plant operators and nuclear regulators have one more disaster to study. david wright, abc news, at the san onofre nuclear power plant in california. and car buyers are going to be seeing the effect of the catastrophe in japan if they're buying japanese. brands like toyota's popular prius hybrid are made entirely in japan. production has been suspended amid the disaster and no sign the assembly lines will be running any time soon. officials in california say damage there from last week's tsunami could top $40 million. in santa cruz harbor, 18 vessels sank, about 100 were damaged and
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another 12 still remain unaccounted for. nearly 60 commercial fishing boats are stuck in the harbor for at least a week while debris is still being cleared. >> how about this story. we're seeing some amazing pictures from mexico as thousands of fish surged to the surface last friday. experts say it's unclear whether or not the strange phenomenon was related to the tsunami. delighted fishermen gave up their rods all together and nets, too and instead scooped up the fish by hand. like shooting fish in a barrel, but right there at the surface. how about that? >> nice catch. making fishing easy. here's your tuesday forecast. a wet day from seattle to san francisco. some heavy mountain snow in the cascades and rockies. a wintry mix from dakotas to northern minnesota. some showers in the ohio valley down to nashville. charleston, west virginia, raleigh and atlanta.
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>> 45 in boston. 51 in baltimore. 66 in new orleans. detroit gets up to 40. omaha, 56. fargo, a balmy 37. 50s from seattle to billings. phoenix hovers near 90. those ever-increasing prices at the pump are forcing some of us to go back to the basics, even when it comes to fighting crime. >> a georgia police department is now using more foot patrols to conserve gas and also officers in the city of griffin say the old style of policing has an added benefit. it brings them back in touch with their community. >> helps them shed a few pounds. >> yeah, burn off a couple of those snacks. >> oh, yeah, watch yourself. nice. some residents are concerned the money-saving move puts their safety at risk, but police say patrol cars are still being used when necessary. >> good to know. there are times when you're going to need the cruiser here and there. we'll be right back with more "world news now" now. ♪ walk this way ♪ [ male announcer ] if you think "heroes" are only in movies consider this:
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welcome back. now to our top story once again, the disaster in the pacific. after the quake, waves of terror washed upon japan's shores. wiping out towns, roads, everything in its way. >> the sheer scope of the disaster caused delays in rescue efforts in many cities, including kesennuma. the bbc rupert winfield hayes was there when rescue teams arrived three days after the quake. >> reporter: in kesennuma, reality has been turned on its head. a large ship sits on a dock side. a fishing boat on top of a car. a car on top of a fence. and a house in the middle of the street. this was kesennuma on friday as the massive tsunami swept in, tossing boats aside like children's toys, uprooting
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houses and turning the city streets into torrents of angry blackwater. much of kesennuma is still under water and walled in by mountains of debris. every street we tried to get down is jammed with piles of cars. even the rescuers are struggling to find a way in. when they do, mostly what they're finding are bodies. this one, a man found trapped underneath a car. nearby, i find this man. his house has been completely destroyed. you can see the tide mark at the top of the first floor. here? but he was lucky. he shows me where he says three bodies were lying until yesterday. one hanging from a lamp post. the old lady in the house next door has also disappeared.
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when the wave came in, i thought i was going to die, he tells me. the water came up around my legs and i thought i would be swept away. i saw a child being swept out to sea. there was nothing i could do to save it. a few meters away, another of his neighbors is picking through the debris of her house, trying to find something, anything, that is still usable. her hall is miserably small. everything here has been utterly destroyed. the level of devastation is really quite hard to comprehend. and this is just one small town. it's still not clear how many more places like this there are scattered along the coast that none of us have seen yet. as we're preparing to leave kesennuma, there's a sudden flurry of excitement. the helicopter hovers low over the town center and from amid the destruction, two survivors are plucked to safety.
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it is a rare moment of hope. the only one we saw here all day. rupert winfield hayes, northern japan. >> really just incredible as we continue to get new pictures, new coverage. especially some of these coastal towns that were hit the hardest, entire towns completely flattened with most of the population just gone. >> just gone. we watched so many reports yesterday and literally the smell of decomposed bodies at this point, you know the bodies they'll find in all that rubble, it may take weeks and weeks to find everybody. it's just heartbreaking to watch this all play out. some towns literally not there anymore. >> to say the least, very tough. we'll lighten the mood a little bit, kind of. this guy joked about the disaster in japan, we've been talking about since friday, but his employer is not laughing along with him. the controversy now involving gilbert gottfried. >> that's right. also the celebrity overachiever who's more than just a pretty face. tyra banks sets her sights on an ivy league goal. ♪ skinny so skinny ♪
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♪ " in a while. it's nice to be back. >> what what's even nicer in like 20 years, charlie sheen is not in "the skinny."
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it's a sheen-free skinny. >> sheen-free show. >> which is nice. >> apparently, we've been talking about this tragedy in japan. some people need to be reminded every now and then that, you know, not everything is funny. >> right. >> there's not a time to joke about everything. but apparently gilbert gottfried is learning that the hard way. you may recognize aflac, the insurance company, and you know their sound. which is -- do we have it? >> i'm glad we got aflac. >> aflac. >> there we go. i didn't know that until tonight that's gilbert gottfried. >> who knew. >> there's a big contract with him and aflac does a ton of business in japan, so why gilbert would tweet some of the things he tweeted yesterday. look at this. you see there on the screen. japan is really advanced. they don't go to the beach. the beach comes to them. then even worse he writes, i just split up with my girlfriend but like the japanese say, there will be another one floating by any minute now. >> anybody watching the news coverage as of late is just disgusted by that. >> what an idiotic horrible thing to say in the midst of this tragedy. i can't believe he said that. aflac didn't find it funny. he was kicked out, fired as the voice of that duck there. rightfully so. what a stupid thing to say. >> if you hear the duck and say, aflac, you'll know why. no longer gilbert gottfried. someone different. guess who's going back to school? not just any school but one of the best schools. we're talking about harvard and tyra banks. she's going back to get a business degree.
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she's in the harvard owner presidential management program. she's not just a pretty face, rob. >> really? >> she's a smart cookie. the reason she's doing this is because of her female followers. she wants to be an inspiration to women who are also interested in owning and running their own businesses. you, too, can attend this program tyra is attending. it will only cost you $31,000 a year. >> oh, that's it? >> for three weeks. >> $31,000 for three weeks? >> the program is three weeks a year for three years. 31 grand a pop, per year. >> is she going to get a degree or a course? >> it's a course where you learn how to run your own business and be the president of your own business. way to go, tyra. miss smarty pants. spending the big coin to go to harvard. >> i'll save comments i have on that. i'm sure she'll be valedictorian. apparently the sex tape is
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its own industry in hollywood but apparently there's a sex tape out there of usher and his ex-wife tamika foster, for sale. all this coming from tmz, they say they received photos and a short video from someone willing to sell the tape. they do have two sons together but now usher's sex tape could be floating out there. >> how do people lose their sex tape? that's always my question. you have the sex tape, shouldn't you, like, protect the sex tape? >> you would think. you would think. ♪ oh, my ♪ he'll be saying that in a few weeks when that thing gets out there. >> do we have time to go to -- >> no. >> no, we're going to move on. >> think about usher, looking for his tape. >> oh, really?
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we know what peggy does in her free time. really? we know what peggy does in her free time.
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updating now the disaster in the pacific. japan's prime minister is telling anyone near the fukushima nuclear plant to stay indoors to avoid radiation sickness. a u.s. official tells abc news a reactor explosion and fire could be catastrophic. experts say friday's quake was a magnitude 9.0 jolt, that's been upgraded from the 8.9. the death toll could reach 10,000 in just one province alone. japan's stock index the nikkei took another major dive. today's drop was around 12%, that's after a 6% plunge on monday. and finally, it is almost impossible to actually fathom the disaster in the pacific but there's one other thing that also seems impossible. this time, however, it's good news. >> amongst all the death, destruction and even ongoing confusion, the japanese people
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have come together in some pretty unbelievable ways. here's diane sawyer. >> reporter: here in the landscape left behind by the storm without pity, the people here show what's always been at the heart of the japanese culture. you need the food. you need the food. >> oh, we are fine. we have enough for us. we want to share. >> reporter: in japan shinto buddhists and confucian traditions promote considering community when you consider yourself. we saw this video on youtube the moment after the earthquake interrupted a graduation ceremony. a brief moment of confusion and then everyone working together to clear the rubble. the prime minister used the phrase in announcing the blackouts he said would be required because of the shortage of electricity. >> translator: this is the toughest and the most difficult crisis for japan. >> reporter: but now we learn the government-ordered blackouts
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don't have to happen because the people voluntarily stopped using nonessential power. this is a shelter. some of these people here for days and, look, it's recycling, organized for recycling. >> plastic, combustible, burnable, cans. >> reporter: the japanese call it etai, it means to come together as one body. and something else astonishing after a disaster, not a single reported case of looting in a country of 128 million people. you'd never believe this mother and so many others patiently hold their children for three hours while waiting to get food. and before we leave, a new mother traveling the day the earthquake struck giving birth amid the aftershocks saying "i hope the baby is strong and brings new hope to japan." >> isn't that incredible? we were commenting on that
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yesterday, we have not seewcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwcwc [ female announcer ] why watch regular tv when you can experience the next generation of television service? at&t u-verse tv. tv like you've never seen before at a really great price. go now to the website below and get u-verse tv starting at just $29 a month for six months, dvr included. or get up to $300 in a promotion card with a qualifying u-verse bundle. u-verse tv lets you record and play back your favorite shows in any room. and you can record up to four shows at once on a single dvr.
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